AnalogKid

Deo volente.

Wild Pig Savages British Nurse

Why does this sound like a Monty Python “And now for something completely different …” Nurse savaged by giant pig.

A nurse has spoken of her terror after she was attacked by a giant pig which charged the horse she was riding and then savaged her after she was thrown to the ground.

Suffering from broken ribs from the fall, Carolyn Robinson feared for her life as the enraged pig hurtled at her.

Hurtled.

The first picture is a representative wild pig, but not the assailant. The second picture is the victim of the attack.


The animal is believed to still be on the loose in Hampshire’s New Forest and police are urging people to be cautious and report any threatening pig incidents.

I wonder if the Hampshire po po know where this guy is.

Mrs Robinson, of Totton, near Southampton, Hants, today described how she first noticed the pig while riding in the New Forest. The experienced horse rider said it initially appeared to be circling a white car parked on a verge with a woman and her dog inside.

Without warning, the pig then fixed her in its sights and suddenly charged at speed, spooking her horse.

“There was nowhere to go,” Mrs Robinson said. “My horse spun around, started to panic and tried to run away. It then bucked, threw me and galloped off.

I’ve seen mad pigs, but never an aggressive one. I wonder if she ran into a boar or some such.

I leave you with the terrifying accounts of the rescue …

“It was terrifying. Ive never been attacked by anything before, let alone a pig. I didnt know how I was going to get out of the situation.”

Mrs Robinsons 18-year-old daughter Charlotte, a student who was riding with her at the time, said: “As soon as my mum hit the ground I knew I had to get it away from her.

“I tried to make my horse attractive to the pig and was leading it around in circles to distract it.”

The angry pig was eventually warded off with the help of a dog walker who had caught Mrs Robinsons horse Norman further down the lane.

The woman in the car also assited by starting to beep the vehicle’s horn.

Mrs Robinson sought refuge in a nearby yard, and was taken to hospital after the attack at Brockis Hill Road, Bartley.

Mrs Robinson said: “It was the biggest pig Ive ever seen around the forest. It was huge. Im only 5ft 4in. It was definitely intent on taking a chunk out of me.

“Without someone there I dare not think what could have happened. Ive come across a lot of pigs but I have never had one run at me at speed.

“It took me five days to talk about it without breaking into tears. I was really shocked and shaken by it.”

Mrs Robinson, a nurse from Huntingdon Close in Totton, spent two days in Southampton General Hospital following the attack.

The fall left her with fractured ribs, concussion and internal bleeding, which bruised half her body.

Animal behaviourist Dr Ann McBride from Southampton University said it was possible that the pig felt threatened and was defending a food source or some young.

She said: “Pigs can kill. They are very strong and have large teeth that can seriously hurt someone.”

Meanwhile, Mrs. Premise and Mrs. Conclusion were seen heading north on M-25.

With all apologies to Nurse Totten, that is the funniest thing I’ve read in a while. Hope she’s better.

 

Advertisements

October 14, 2006 - Posted by | British

8 Comments »

  1. […] I’m pretty sure that whatever doubt there was about that is now gone. I mean, a wild pig savages a nurse from Totten, and I’m thinking Hugo Chavez and British Humor. […]

    Pingback by I’m going to Hell « Innocent Bystanders | October 14, 2006 | Reply

  2. I’m going to a deeper circle of hell than you. I kept wondering exactly what “savaged her” meant.

    Comment by skinbad | October 16, 2006 | Reply

  3. Ooooohhhhhhh.

    Even I, in my inexplicable obtuseness, didn’t go there. Congratulations, my friend.

    Comment by John | October 16, 2006 | Reply

  4. A strange coincidence. The enraged pig attacked the nurse on Brockis Hill Road. The name Brockis, (formerly Brocas (French) is rare..

    I am just writing articles on The Beast of Gevaudan, described as hyena or pig like, which killed people in 18th century France. They never caught it. Derek Brockis

    Comment by Derek Brockis | April 4, 2007 | Reply

  5. It seems to be three years now since the savage pig attacked the riding nurse. Is the pig still uncaught and have there been any more incidents of this type?

    Comment by Derek Brockis | September 1, 2009 | Reply

  6. Strange how interest in such an unusual incident should have died so quickly and completely. Surely someone saw a pig rnnning about in the New Forest.Also someoe such as a farmer or lorry driver must have missed a pig at the time

    Please come forward and satisfy our curosity, even if anonymously. At lest give us hint. Derek Brockis

    Comment by Derek Brockis | September 15, 2009 | Reply

  7. Alas, no comments on the savage nurse-biting pig,
    It looks as if the French are going to keep their ‘B♪te du Gévaudan’ but we are for eve to be denied ‘Le pPorc du Hampshire’. Dere Brockis

    Comment by Derek Brockis | September 25, 2009 | Reply

  8. It is a pity that interest in this story has died out. People have often been attacked by pigs on farms. An old friend of mine, name of Jack Watmough, once was – in 1947 in Cheshire, just after the war, when many people kept a pig, feeding it on scraps, for food. Chickens as well.
    His advice was always keep a bristle broom handy. A pig will not charge a broom – it is intelligent and fears for its eyes Derek Brockis

    Comment by Derek Brockis | April 17, 2010 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: